Friday, January 24, 2014

Back...

I have been overseas the past couple months with no ...access...

Rather than coming in a flurry, it seems that the Snowden revelations slowly trickle in each month. It is important that every sovereign person reading this take great care to not let our corrupt and tyrannical government track them through technology.

This technology exists in the Home of The Free® as well:
Maybe the most Orwellian Text Message Ever Sent

Hat tip WRSA.

Monday, October 28, 2013

OBEY: Suspicion of pot leads to execution of Michigan father

MLive story

This man was gunned down in front of his toddler during a CPS kidnapping gone wrong.

I would love to hear the hypocritical uproar should someone seriously suggest that cops follow the same laws as citizens.


Sultan Knish: Government is Magic

Government is Magic
Our technocracy is detached from competence. It's not the technocracy of engineers, but of "thinkers" who read Malcolm Gladwell and Thomas Friedman and watch TED talks and savor the flavor of competence, without ever imbibing its substance. - See more at: http://sultanknish.blogspot.com/2013/10/government-is-magic.html#sthash.drVZJcXH.dpuf
Our technocracy is detached from competence. It's not the technocracy of engineers, but of "thinkers" who read Malcolm Gladwell and Thomas Friedman and watch TED talks and savor the flavor of competence, without ever imbibing its substance.
Our technocracy is detached from competence. It's not the technocracy of engineers, but of "thinkers" who read Malcolm Gladwell and Thomas Friedman and watch TED talks and savor the flavor of competence, without ever imbibing its substance. - See more at: http://sultanknish.blogspot.com/2013/10/government-is-magic.html#sthash.drVZJcXH.dpuf
Our technocracy is detached from competence. It's not the technocracy of engineers, but of "thinkers" who read Malcolm Gladwell and Thomas Friedman and watch TED talks and savor the flavor of competence, without ever imbibing its substance. - See more at: http://sultanknish.blogspot.com/2013/10/government-is-magic.html#sthash.drVZJcXH.dpuf
Our technocracy is detached from competence. It's not the technocracy of engineers, but of "thinkers" who read Malcolm Gladwell and Thomas Friedman and watch TED talks and savor the flavor of competence, without ever imbibing its substance. - See more at: http://sultanknish.blogspot.com/2013/10/government-is-magic.html#sthash.drVZJcXH.dpuf
Our technocracy is detached from competence. It's not the technocracy of engineers, but of "thinkers" who read Malcolm Gladwell and Thomas Friedman and watch TED talks and savor the flavor of competence, without ever imbibing its substance. - See more at: http://sultanknish.blogspot.com/2013/10/government-is-magic.html#sthash.drVZJcXH.dpuf
Our technocracy is detached from competence. It's not the technocracy of engineers, but of "thinkers" who read Malcolm Gladwell and Thomas Friedman and watch TED talks and savor the flavor of competence, without ever imbibing its substance. - See more at: http://sultanknish.blogspot.com/2013/10/government-is-magic.html#sthash.drVZJcXH.dpuf
Our technocracy is detached from competence. It's not the technocracy of engineers, but of "thinkers" who read Malcolm Gladwell and Thomas Friedman and watch TED talks and savor the flavor of competence, without ever imbibing its substance. - See more at: http://sultanknish.blogspot.com/2013/10/government-is-magic.html#sthash.drVZJcXH.dpuf
Our technocracy is detached from competence. It's not the technocracy of engineers, but of "thinkers" who read Malcolm Gladwell and Thomas Friedman and watch TED talks and savor the flavor of competence, without ever imbibing its substance. - See more at: http://sultanknish.blogspot.com/2013/10/government-is-magic.html#sthash.drVZJcXH.dpuf
Our technocracy is detached from competence. It's not the technocracy of engineers, but of "thinkers" who read Malcolm Gladwell and Thomas Friedman and watch TED talks and savor the flavor of competence, without ever imbibing its substance. - See more at: http://sultanknish.blogspot.com/2013/10/government-is-magic.html#sthash.drVZJcXH.dpuf
Our technocracy is detached from competence. It's not the technocracy of engineers, but of "thinkers" who read Malcolm Gladwell and Thomas Friedman and watch TED talks and savor the flavor of competence, without ever imbibing its substance. - See more at: http://sultanknish.blogspot.com/2013/10/government-is-magic.html#sthash.drVZJcXH.dpuf
Our technocracy is detached from competence. It's not the technocracy of engineers, but of "thinkers" who read Malcolm Gladwell and Thomas Friedman and watch TED talks and savor the flavor of competence, without ever imbibing its substance. - See more at: http://sultanknish.blogspot.com/2013/10/government-is-magic.html#sthash.drVZJcXH.dpuf
This is a brilliant essay on the theme I was getting at in my Best and Brightest Save Obamacare post.

Tuesday, October 22, 2013

Gary from Bugoutvehicles

I always enjoy watching Gary's videos. Many of them are thought provoking on preparing for a "bugout" scenario. Some of them are downright 'out there.' Nevertheless, I have gotten several good ideas from Gary's videos. He lives an enviable lifestyle, one which most of us cannot.

Here is a video about his bugout trailer (he has probably close to a dozen bugout vehicles).



Monday, October 21, 2013

The 'Best and Brightest' to Save Obamacare

 Originally posted on American Thinker, October 21 2013.

This month's launch of the Obamacare Exchanges has been a complete train wreck, as the bill's co-author Senator Max Baucus predicted back in April. Although it's difficult not to take some delight in the woes wrought by Democrat hubris, the American people are truly the losers in this instant loser of a government program.

Never fear, citizen. Health and Human Services Secretary (a far more powerful position under the law) Kathleen Sebelius intends to fix the broken website by utilizing the services of the best and the brightest. Perhaps Google will send in a mercenary contingent using some of the government subsidized fuel their jet fleet was privy to up until September 2013. As put on a Health and Human Services blog post, complete with a silly pun which probably cost us in the thousands:

“Our team is bringing in some of the best and brightest from both inside and outside government to scrub in with the team and help improve HealthCare.gov."

If readers want a primer on the origins of the ironic term (the irony is clearly lost on Democrats) "best and brightest," what better book to read than "The Best and The Brightest" by David Halberstam. The book exhaustively details how the best and brightest academics and corporate executives in America lost a war against a pip-squeak nation, and got nearly 60,000 American fighting men killed in the process. One of these great minds, Robert McNamara, turned the running of the war into an MBA case study; apparently metrics such as body count and tons of bombs dropped don't directly translate into wars won. Thank God this man never had access to PowerPoint.

The book also briefly touches on Lyndon Johnson's Great Society, another wildly unsuccessful boondoggle brought to you by The Smartest People In The Room. To return to the issue at hand, it is truly perplexing that after decades of failed big government programs, fully half of this country believes that a few technocrats will fix healthcare and we will all live happily ever after.

This episode is just one in a multi-season show called How Government Destroyed The Healthcare System. Tune in next season for the back-alley LASIK episode.

Sunday, October 20, 2013

'Come And Take It' Wins in San Antonio


 Originally published on American Thinker, October 20 2013.

On Saturday, several hundred pro-gun activists demonstrated with long guns in the plaza of The Alamo, in San Antonio, Texas. The organizers' Facebook page didn't specify why The Alamo was chosen as the site of the demonstration, but its history provides clues.

 The iconic Spanish mission/fortification was the site of the bloodiest military defeat (but perhaps the greatest moral victory) in the Texas Revolution. A semi-organized band of armed civilians held off the Mexican Army for 13 days, before capitulating in a final bloodbath once their enemy breached the walls. The Anglo fighters revolted against Santa Anna's Mexican government because the Federalist constitution of 1824 had been disregarded, and the Mexican army had attempted months earlier to seize some of the Texans' armaments (specifically a canon). The battle over a small canon in Gonzalas, Texas, the first of the revolution, gave rise to the now famous flag:



Prior to yesterday's event, the San Antonio police had harassed open carriers of firearms in the city, and threatened to arrest the demonstrators. Because of the large number and peaceful nature of the protesters, no incidents with the police are known at this time.

There are lessons we can take from this event here and now, and some still to come. The lack of incidents with police is remarkable. San Antonio is an extremely blue city, with an aggressively anti-gun police chief. The protester's fortune cannot be written off to Texas being a gun-friendly state. Rather, their methods of entry to the demonstration site and conduct while there should be studied. It boils down to strength in numbers, and polite behavior. One of the event's speakers posted a list of widely circulated guidelines on his blog prior to the event, and they seemed to have been effective.

The long term effect of demonstrations like this is not entirely clear. We saw something similar just days ago when jilted veterans deposited the "Barrycades" blocking off war memorials onto the White House lawn. The media predictably treats these displays with low-key coverage. Twitter posts are also predictable; liberals decry the disruptive nature of liberty lovers, and conservatives express approval. Amongst liberals in Texas, the reaction has been so far limited to a few pitiful and muted editorials. The obligatory tsk-tsk in the Fort Worth Star Telegram is even unsigned.

History is rife with examples of civil disobedience leading to greater victories for the rights of those struggling, but it is also rife with examples of nothing at all coming from demonstrations. As the strategy pertains to gun rights, playing nice and polite politics has met with limited success as of late. The fact is that most legislators in both parties are uneasy with America's love of the gun.

For today, this civil disobedience must be marked as a victory. San Antonio's petty Ayatollahs were simply too cowed by the horde of free citizens to practice their usual "we don't like your kind around here, boy" routine. It is a good thing when the nanny state is unmasked as impotent.

UPDATE: An informed commenter at American Thinker noted that a few remaining demonstrators were threatened once the main body left. Obviously strength in numbers is key.

Saturday, October 19, 2013

Cops Gone Wild

Rough Men Stand Ready to Kill You in Your Bed

Great blog post over at Pro Libertate on some of the most recent episodes of cops breaking into peoples' houses and gunning them down for no good reason. It is well researched, thorough, and might get your blood boiling.

The cops in this country have taken a war posture. Their behavior is very similar to what was done against AQ in Iraq. This has got to stop. To give credit where credit is due, much of their new "play army" toys are paid for by the Feds, and I believe that this dangerous mindset of "us vs them" is a byproduct of the War on Terror.